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Posts tagged ‘lecturing’

The Case for Lecturing More: Sharing Our Insights to Motivate Insight

There appears to be a cottage industry of thinkpieces in defense of the lecture.  Alex Small defends his mixed lecture and discussion approach in the Chronicle of Higher Education several years ago in his piece, In Defense of the Lecture.  He defends the lecture as an opportunity to put on display the way an expert in a field approach problems.  He also describes how he uses discussion to set up and break up the parts of class where he lectures.  Miya Tokumitsu defends the art of collective listening in her piece in Jacobin earlier this year, In Defense of the Lecture.  In 2009, Adam Kotsko wrote A Defense of the Lecture for Inside Higher Ed in which he argues that lecturing can help bring students to the level of good readers so that an engaged discussion might ensue.

In planning for courses in my return from sabbatical, I spent some time thinking about why I have typically refrained from lecturing.  I tend to conduct class in a way that tries to get students to come to insights on their own.  But I found that this approach has a certain inauthenticity insofar as it involves asking questions I already know the answer to.  My thinking has been that students learn better when they reach their conclusion themselves, but I think that supposes that there is a limited number of insights and that I have already had them.  The result is that I hold them back to lead students to have insights. Read more